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    How to feed Swans, Ducks and Geese?

    ArticlePoultry AdviceTuesday 11 October 2011
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    People are generally delighted to have these birds move into their local pond for them to enjoy.

    In general, it is not a good idea to feed wild birds as it will increase their dependence on us for survival - and the food humans frequently feed them (such as bread and chips) is utterly unsuitable for them and can cause multiple health problems for them down the line.

    • Swans: In summer, the diet of swans consists mainly of aquatic vegetation, eaten while swimming, such as underwater plants and algae (Note: as algae eaters, they can be valuable in shallow bay areas, in rivers and ponds)
      • Grasses found along the banks.
      • They are also insectivores and will eat small insects
      • At other times of year, they also eat cultivated grains in open fields

    • Ducks feed off of larvae and pupae usually found under rocks, aquatic animals, plant material, seeds, small fish, snails, and crabs.

    • Geese are herbivorous and their natural diet consists of grass They may also feed on aquatic plant material and waste grain left in plowed fields, as well as mollusks, crustaceans and even small fish. Many of them (such as the Roman Rufted Geese) also eat bugs, which makes them an excellent choice for those wishing to control insect populations in the backyard.
      • Note: Feeding geese is likely to reduce or even eliminates their value as natural insect controller in the backyard

     

    Feeding Swans, Ducks and Geese - the right way

    Please note that their natural diet is best for them and that filling them up with food that is not part of their natural diet should be avoided, as it will prevent them from getting the nutrition they need as well as being potentially harmful.

    However, when winter conditions set in and little food is available - our help in providing food is likely to be very appreciated and may be even life-saving.

    What NOT to feed:

    Anything that is NOT healthy for us: sugary, starchy, fatty foods, junk food, fast food.

    Bread, chips, cakes, cookies, and cereal, etc - as these foods can cause digestive and serious other health problem.

    Cooked and processed foods.

    What to feed:

    Note: Any food fed to them should be in manageable size for swallowing. Foods should be as natural as possible, unprocessed without harmful additives.

    Particularly in the winter months when grasses or other plant vegetation is scarce, greens such as dark green lettuce, spinach, chopped/shredded carrots, celery and alfalfa sprouts and other vegetables and greens make a great supplement. Note that lettuce may be an acquired taste and the swans may take a while to get used to it. Any vegetables need to be cut up into small pieces. Remember, birds don't have teeth!

    Other foods to feed: Healthy popcorn (without artificial coloring and flavorings); corn / cracked corn; whole wheat GRAIN (not processed, not bread - natural state grain); whole oats; brown rice, lentils, split peas and smallish seeds

    Equally loved and cherished are peelings from our own food preparations for dinner, such as broccoli, potatoes, green beans, cabbage -- gently steamed (only enough to warm up - NEVER cook and NEVER use the microwave to warm up) and feed warm (not hot) to swans who will especially appreciate that when it's cold outside

     

    How to feed:

    • Any food should be thrown onto the water so that they can swallow water together with the food, which helps them digest the food more easily.

    • Also, feeding swans, ducks and geese on land encourages them to leave the water whenever they see people, which can put them at significant risk if dogs or other predators are about.

    • Also remember, even though you obviously have a deep love for these magnificent birds, there are people out there who will harm them. Turning swans into trusting pets will put them at risk.


    Watch and enjoy them from afar,

    not drawing their attention to you as much as possible.

     

     

    Source: Avian Web

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