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    Hand feeding Protocol

    ArticlePoultry AdviceFriday 18 November 2011
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    Good hand-feeding methods, proper socialization and weaning are very important aspects in raising chicks. Breeders are using a variety of methods for feeding their chicks.
     
    1- Feeding utensils: The syringe or feeding spoon should be sterile and available. If you decide on a syringe, they have really good ones in your local (better) drug stores - in the BABY section. They also have syringes in the pet stores but they are actually more expensive and utterly inferior. 
     
     
    2- Formula: Prepare the formula following manufacturer's directions.
     
    a) Temperature: make sure that it is between 100 and 105 degrees. The temperature of the formula should not go below 100 degrees F, or else it can result in slow crop and other problems. Anything over 105 degrees, on the other hand, may burn the chick's crop. Microwaving formula may leave hot spots causing crop burn. The temperature needs to be consistent and needs to remain the right temperature while feeding. You can place the formula dish into another larger dish filled with hot water to prevent the temperature from going down. 
    b) Consistency: Too thin a formula will prevent the chick from getting the nutrition it needs. Too thick will cause crop impaction. Follow directions. Chicks love the taste of peanut butter and it will help them gain weight. 
     
     
    3- Feeding: Place the feeding utensil of your choice against the chick's beak. This should start the feeding response. If you do not see the throat moving in a swallowing motion, do not attempt to feed as the chick could very easily choke or inhale the formula. If you don't see a feeding response, tap against the beak with the syringe or spoon, and/or put a drop of the formula inside the mouth. Once you see a feeding response administer the formula slowly, making sure you don't overfeed.
     
     
    4- Sanitation: After feeding the chick, wipe it down with a wet paper towel using warm water to prevent the chick from getting chilled. Add a couple of drops of GSE to the water for disinfecting purposes. Clean out the inside of the chick's mouth with a Q-Tip and warm water to reduce the possibility of a crop infection. Change the paper towel in the brooder and place the chick back into the clean brooder. 
     
     
    5- Frequency of Feeding: Feeding frequency varies, depending on the size and age of the chick. The rule of thumb is:
     
    a) The crop needs to empty once a day. If it doesn't empty, give the chick some Pedialyte to stop the food becoming dry and impacting the crop. Wait until the crop is down before feeding to avoid the food inside the crop from being sour resulting in slow crop. 
     
    b) For the rest of the day, observe the chicks and feed them when their crops are nearly empty. Don't allow the crop to empty several times a day -- or for them to be with an empty crop for long, as they need nutrition. You may feed a very young / small chick every 1 - 1 1/2 hours (finches even every 30 minutes) day AND night; the older ones every 3 to 4 hours. Once they are a few days old, you can make the formula a little thicker, which will sustain them through the night (not longer than six hours though). 
     
    c) Some vets recommend adding peanut butter to the chick's formula. Adding peanut butter to the formula, you will find that they don't get as hungry (less begging). 
     
    d) Weaning your birds: It is important to provide a wide variety of foods to young weaning birds. If they are only fed a limited diet of seeds, they will be reluctant to try many new food items in the future, which would be detrimental to their health.
     
     
    6- Weighing / Monitoring the Chick's Weight: You will need a scale to monitor the chick's weight.
     
     
    Source: Avian Web

     

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