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    How to Breed Indian Fantail Pigeons

    ArticlePigeon AdviceWednesday 31 October 2012
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    If you want to breed your Indian Fantails, remember that you cannot force them. Bird’s, like any other animals, need to naturally begin the mating process, however there are ways you can encourage this.

    Firstly, it may seem obvious, but you need to check that you have a different sex pairing. Even if they mate, they may still be of the same sex and therefore they will not be able to reproduce.

    When you are sure of this, making the birds feel comfortable and non-threatened is a very important step. This means giving them plenty of space and a calm environment to live in.  A nesting box is a great way to set the mating process in motion. Also building a nest for them will help. This can be with a variety of materials. However, the best would be pine needles, hay or dry grass.

    If the birds do go onto breed, then these are the signs and the mating rituals that they will present:

    • Kissing
    • Mating
    • Cooing
    • Nesting
    • Male may dance around the female

    Any pigeons, including Indian Fantails, lay their eggs around 10 days after mating. The Indian Fantail mating process is very similar to any other pigeon; they will then sit on the eggs and wait for them to hatch.

    You will need to be patient as it may not happen imminently, or it is possible that your pair may not want to mate because they are not 'attracted' to each other. 

     

    Look for nesting boxes here.

     

    Photo by Jennifer Graevell

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