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    How to stop a parrot screaming so much

    ArticleParrot AdviceMonday 29 April 2013
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    Parrots can be incredibly noisy at times for a large variety of reasons. They will make noise at the start of the day and at the end of the day, they will scream when they are excited or bored and they are also vocal if they hear noise or not enough. Parrots will never scream with the sole purpose to annoy you. Usually there are underlying issues in the enviroment they live in. There are a few tips you can pick up on to help train your parrot to make less noise that we have put together. 
    • First you should understand that screaming is normal behaviour like scratching for a cat and barking for a dog. Never should you aim to completely stop it as it is natural behaviour for a parrot and they have been screaming for hundreds of thousands of years in the jungle. Furthermore by letting a parrot scream during the day, it will mean that they will not scream at night. As discussed earlier, common times are early in the morning and before resting.
    • Punishment – You should never punish a parrot. Unlike humans, parrots and other pets never do bad things on purpose. They do things because it is natural to them or they are not feeling comfortable in their environments. It will also have the opposite effect on what you’re trying to achieve. Parrots will be terrified and scream even more.
    • Check for any health issues your parrot may have. Parrots in pain often scream and your parrot may have an issue with its body. Problems may be hidden so your parrot will need to be given a thorough check. If still worried then see a qualified vet who can give a competent checkover to your bird.
    • Check that your parrot’s needs are being met and they feel safe in their environment. The cage should be of a suitable size and also have toys to play with.  If too small the parrot could feel threatened, restless and bored.
    • You need to make sure your parrot is being fed on a correct diet including vegetables and some fruit now and again. An incorrect diet will lead to imbalances in health and problems.
    • Parrots should have at least an hour of playtime with you a day. If not they may become bored and seek attention through screaming.
    • Parrots should get at least 10-12 hours of sleep a day. If not they can be come grouchy and angry like humans and this can mean further screaming and even biting.
    • Try to ignore your parrot. Your usual response when your parrot screams would be to go over to it. This however reinforces that they are doing something right. Even so much as a change in facial expression can entice it on more. Good advice would be to completely leave the room. This shows the parrot you are not impressed.
    • Reward your parrot through periods of silence and good behaviour. You have to be careful though as it may scream just as you arrive at the cage which reinforces the bad behaviour
    As a general rule of thumb parrots need a good level of attention, regular checks from the vet and also a good place to live. Without any of these a parrot will not be able and thus express itself through screaming. If you cannot provide for it then you should considering re-homing it.
     
    As a visual guide we have included this useful video to quickly show so some advice.

    Photo: Seabamirum
    Source: Wikihow

     

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