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    How to Prevent Parrot Fever

    ArticleParrot AdviceFriday 01 July 2011
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    How to avoid catching the potentially fatal parrot fever

    Parrot fever, or Chlamydia psittaci, is a virus that can be present in parrots, parakeets, macaws, lovebirds and cockatiels. More common birds, such as pigeons and doves, can also be carriers.

     

    If you've been infected with the parrot fever bug, you will start showing symptoms in about five to 14 days. A moderate case of parrot fever will cause appetite loss and give you a headache, fever, chills, fatigue, and cough. If left untreated, parrot fever can lead to pneumonia (inflammation of the lungs) and affect the liver. Antibiotics will take care of most cases of parrot fever, and the vast majority of infected people recover completely.

     

    If you have a pet bird make sure you watch for signs of parrot fever. Sometimes they show no symptoms but often birds with Chlamydia psittaci will be lethargic, refuse to eat, have ruffled feathers, diarrhea, runny eyes and nose, and green or yellow-green urine. If your bird shows these symptoms, avoid handling it and get your vet to give you antibiotics. As a preventative measure, clean your bird’s cage regularly with disinfectant and make sure you use a mask and gloves whilst doing so.

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