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    Teaching Your Parrot Colours

    ArticleThursday 09 December 2010
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    Training parrots is a good way of strengthening the relationship between owners and birds. Parrot training is usually enjoyed by parrots and it keeps them stimulated which is very important for the wellbeing of the bird. When you teach a parrot something new it is a good idea to treat it and talk to it as though it is a child. %%AFC-ADVERT%%

    If you are patient and speak slowly, the parrot will learn a great deal from you. When you are training parrots to recognise colours it is vital that you remember a parrot’s vision is different than ours. They have more cones than we do in their eyes, and this results in greater depth of colours visible. For this reason, you must start with simple primary colours so they do not get confused later.

    •    Your parrot training sessions should start off in short periods of time, between 5 and 10 minutes. This time can be built up as progress is made.

    •    Start off training parrots colours with something like a colourful children’s book. Make sure your bird can see the book properly.

    •    Find a large red picture in the book and ask the parrot to “find something red”. When saying this, hold the red part of the book up to the parrot’s beak so that he is pointing at it. Praise the bird using the word “red” lots of times. Use the same phrases each time, such as “well done, you found something red”. Reward your bird with a treat, constantly praising.

    •    Keep repeating this process and ask for other colours in the book too.

    •    After a number of parrot training sessions, you can progress to asking the parrot for a colour and waiting to see if he directs his beak, without you moving the book for him.

    •    When you see some progress has been made, you can graduate to coloured objects. You could use coloured toys that are made for toddlers. Use a toy that has several primary colours on it and ask the parrot to find a specific colour. If and when the bird correctly identifies a colour, give the toy to him to play with as a reward. Remember to keep praising when the parrot is successful.

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