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    Make Your Own Bird Toys

    ArticleThursday 09 December 2010
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    Bird Toys Guide

     

    Many bird owners find the biggest problem they encounter with keeping domesticated birds is boredom within the cage – something which can lead to either subdued or destructive behaviour. One way to get around the problem is to place a number of bird toys into the cage.

    You needn’t spend copious amount of money on bird toys – many can be homemade without any trouble at too. Learn how you can make your own pet toys for birds in the guide below.


    Bird Cage Supplies: Homemade Bird Toys


    1.    Remember, you are the person who knows your bird’s character best, so the amount of homemade pet toys you need to make will be dependent on a bird’s boredom threshold. If a bird is more than happy to entertain itself during the day, you’ll probably only need to install a couple of toys into a cage. More active, curious birds will require several toys to stay mentally stimulated.


    2.    The size of the toy should be in relative proportion to the bird’s body – after all, an excessively large toy might actually intimidate your bird rather than engage its interest. On the other hand, small bird cage toys may not last much beyond a week if a bird begins to become restless and destructive. Therefore, try and strike a happy balance by creating a toy that is large enough to be a source of interest to the bird and one that will last for a substantial amount of time.

    3.    Keep the dynamics of the cage in your mind at all times as you build parrot toys – especially if you are planning a hanging toy. A toy that hangs should not take up too much space in the cage, as it might actually restrict movement rather than encourage it. There are several types of hanging toys that a bird will appreciate, including ladders, hanging gardens and climbing ropes.

    4.    Aside from pet toys that encourage movement, you’ll need to think about bird cage supplies that will deter a bird from chewing the cage in moments of boredom. Therefore, it’s worth considering adding some chewable bird toys to the cage.

    These can be as simple as possible, provided you offer the bird a challenge – for instance, a hard nut hanging from a string is more than adequate as a means of offering a bird a chewing game. Although it may be undesirable in terms of the bird cage, chewing is an essential activity for sharpening the beak, so you should try to encourage the behaviour – but channel it in the right manner.


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