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    Hand Feed a Wild Baby Bird of Prey

    ArticleThursday 09 December 2010
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    There are many reasons why you have to start feeding wild birds; you may find a chick that has fallen from the nest that will need caring for. Young birds of prey need a lot of care, attention and experience to ensure they survive so your number one goal should be to take the chick to a bird of prey centre, which may not be possible straight away however so this guide outlines the basics of wild bird feeding. %%AFC-ADVERT%%

     

    Making Your Wild Bird Feeding Station

     

    • The first thing you need to is to make some sort of temporary nest for the chick. A dog crate or cardboard box can be good for this. Line the box with thick towel and place the chick in there. You can keep heat in by placing a towel over the top.

     

    • The same formula used for hand feeding parrots is good for feeding wild birds. The formula will come with instructions as to how to mix it. Make sure that the formula is the correct temperature; a digital thermometer can help with this. Stir the formula to make sure the formula is a constant temperature throughout before you start the wild bird feeding.

     

    • A syringe is one of the best ways of feeding wild birds. They don’t have needles on them and can often be purchased alongside the formula. If for any reason you can’t get hold of a syringe, an eye dropper would be adequate. When feeding wild birds it is important to observe their behaviour. Usually, during wild bird feeding, the chick will tilt their heads back and open their mouths wide. Hold the syringe over their heads and if they exhibit this behaviour, gently drop some of the formula into the bird’s mouth. Make sure you go about wild bird feeding with slow and steady movements.

     

    • The bedding in the wild bird feeding station may need to be changed occasionally. For a wild bird, feeding occurs every two or three hours so repeat the previous step as necessary.

     

    • Keep feeding the birds every couple of hours until you are able to get the chick to a bird of prey centre. They will be able to provide professional care and possibly release it back into the wild once it has grown enough.
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