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    Ducks for Sale: Mallard Ducks

    ArticleThursday 09 December 2010
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    The Mallard duck is probably the most well known duck in the world. If you are looking to buy ducks for sale then Mallard ducks might be for you. This article will tell you a bit about Mallard ducks.

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    A Mallard is a dabbling duck and breeds throughout Europe, some parts of America, Asia, New Zealand and Australia. Mallard ducks are between 56 and 65 cm long and have a wing span of 81 to 98 cm. The male Mallard is unmistakable because of their bright green heads, black rear and yellow orange bill which are tipped with black. Female Mallards are light brown like other dabbling ducks. One of the most interesting things about the appearance of the Mallard is their distinct purple speculum which is edged in white.

     

    Mallard ducks inhabit wetlands, ponds and rivers and they feed by dabbling for plant food. If you are going to buy Mallard ducks for sale then you will need to be able to provide them with a suitable living environment.

     

    In the wild Mallard ducks migrate and form pairs only until the female Mallard lays eggs. After the female Mallard has laid her eggs the make leaves her. A female Mallard will have a clutch of 8 to 13 eggs which she will incudate for 27 to 28 days and then they will hatch and not fledge the nest until 50 to 60 days.

     

    Mallard ducklings are precocial which means they can swim and feed themselves as soon as they hatch although they always stay near to their mother for protection.  

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