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    Building an Incubator

    ArticleThursday 09 December 2010
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    A lot of people that raise and keep birds will want their eggs to hatch in an egg incubator. Incubators offer a constant temperature and humidity to the eggs, meaning that the most number possible will hatch and survive. This guide outlines how to build an incubator of the convection type with products found at home. A convection egg incubator boasts a thermometer, a hygrometer and a convection airflow system to maintain the perfect conditions. %%AFC-ADVERT%%

     

    Build an Incubator

     

    • To build an incubator, you will need a fairly large and sturdy box, lined with aluminium foil to keep the heat in. You will also need a pie tin that is placed in the bottom of the egg incubator.

     

    • Place a piece of wood either side of the pie tin and place a wire screen between the two, this is where the eggs will sit and this will prevent the hatchlings from falling into the water in the pie tin below. The two pieces of wood should be 1x2” and the wire should be no larger than ½”. The water in the pie tin ensures the correct humidity once the egg incubator is turned on.

     

    • Incubators need ventilation so cut ½” holes in each of the corners of the egg incubator cover. Cut two more ¼” holes on both sides above where the eggs will sit. You will also need to drill additional holes for the thermometer, the thermostat and the hygrometer probes.

     

    • By now your egg incubator should be taking shape. The next step when you build an incubator is to install the lights. Put one in each upper corner. It is best to make a hole in the egg incubator and push the inner components of the socket through that hole. You can then screw the ceramic insulator back over the internals and install the light bulbs, thus making the egg incubator nearly complete. Don’t put the lights in the cover of the egg incubator as you will disturb the lights every time you open it.

     

    • You will need to wire the thermostat to the light sockets within the egg incubator. The thermostat will come with instructions; follow these as each thermostat will be slightly different. Incubators need to be kept at a constant temperature and the thermostat’s probe should be put through the hole previously drilled and the temperature should be set accordingly.

     

    • Place the thermometer’s probe through one of the holes drilled earlier, do the same with the hygrometer’s probe. You are nearly ready to start using the egg incubator

     

    • The last step is to fill the pie tin with water, place fertile eggs on to the wire screen close the cover and then turn the lights on and wait.

     

    Tips & Advice

     

    • There are many different types of thermostat that you can use for incubators. A thermostat from a hardware store will be fine, as will one intended for reptile tanks.

     

    • It is important to use bulbs that are under 25W, anything higher will run too hot.

     

    • Always make sure that there is water in the pie tin throughout the entire incubation process.
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