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    Interesting Bird Song Facts

    ArticleBird AdviceMonday 14 January 2013
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    Listening to bird calls and songs at dawn and dusk can be one of the great joys in life - but what do the calls actually mean? And can we interpret anything about them?

    Firstly, it's important to state that no one bird's call is the same as another, even if it appears as if this is the case when birds sing in unison.

    A bird song is simply a primary form of communication between birds, and songs can be both an expression of contentment and a warning sign to others about the presence of predators.

    In fact, birds would struggle to survive in the wild without the ability to make calls and sing - as mentioned above, a song can both deter other birds from entering an area in which their life could be placed in danger, and can act as a symbol of the presence of food.

    Learning to understand bird calls can be a tricky exercise, but it is possible with patience and persistence. You'll need to wake up at the crack of dawn to really listen closely to the unique sound quality of individual bird calls.

    We've all heard of the craze for 'brain training' in recent years, and there is some scope to apply training techniques to identify separate bird calls. One system that can work well is the association game - match a bird call to a common everyday sound (such as a yelp or a whistle) - and this may help make identification easier.

    If fact, if you're looking to excel as a birdwatcher, learning the difference between bird calls can be all important if you want to catch that rare shot of your favourite bird breed in flight.t

     

    Photo by Bill Nicholls  

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