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    How to Tame Your Pet Bird

    ArticleBird AdviceMonday 30 May 2011
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    Birds for sale make wonderful pets but many birds can develop, or even be born with, behavioural issues that can turn them into a bit of a nightmare at times. These issues include screaming, biting and even self-harm. Learn how to tame your bird if it has these problems.

    The bird’s cage needs to be of an appropriate size – the minimum cage size should be at least 1 and a half times the bird’s wingspan in height, width and depth of the cage. Remember this is a MINIMUM size, so try your best to give your bird as much space as possible. Place the cage at eye level against a wall because the bird will feel secure if it can retreat against a wall. Do not place the cage on the floor as the bird will be on the lookout for predators and will be hard to tame.

    Acquaint the bird with your hands and your voice by opening the cage and slowly moving your hands by the cage door. Soft talking or singing will relax the bird. Most birds require at least one to four days to become acquainted to their new cage and new surroundings. If the bird seems stressed, simply walk by his cage a few times a day and speak gently but do not open the cage.

    Teach the bird to perch on your hand by placing a millet treat in your hand and slowly presenting it to the bird. If the bird is frightened of your hand, simply drop the treat into the cage. Keep talking to the bird in a soothing voice. The bird will begin to associate your voice with the treat. Once the bird becomes used to your hand, rest the treat on your finger and say "step up." If the bird is still reluctant to step onto your hand, hold out a stick. Praise the bird and offer it a treat when it steps onto the stick.

    Keep training sessions to 15 minutes or less and end on a positive note with praise.

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