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    Growing Maggots for Chicken Feed

    ArticlePoultry AdviceFriday 04 February 2011
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    When keeping chickens growing maggots is an economical and easy way to provide a good source of fat and protein in chicken feed. You may think that this isn’t exactly a desirable sounding activity, but if you know what to do it doesn’t have to be unpleasant at all. If you are thinking about chickens for sale, this guide outlines an affordable way of keeping chickens well-fed. 

     
     
    By using soldier fly maggots rather than house fly ones, you avoid all the issues such as smell, disease and fly infestation. Soldiers feed on compost, so the absence of meat limits the disease risk. They also auto-harvest, keep away from humans and repel house flies.

    Start with a container for growing your maggots for chicken feed. This container must not allow any escape, so don’t use a compost pile that has an open bottom. Around the container install a ramp so that the maggots can climb. Drill a hole at the top of the ramp so that the maggots ready to be adults can get out and up the ramp. 

    It’s up to you whether you place the container in chicken coops so the chickens can eat as the maggots leave, or you can place a bucket under the hole to collect them.

    From an existing compost pile, collect soldier fly maggots. If this is not available you can buy maggots online. When you’ve established a colony, the adult soldiers will come back so long as there’s food in your container. For the best chicken feed, fill the container with kitchen scraps, manure or meat. It’s important to keep this material moist, but don’t soak it.

    Be sure to keep the pile warm by leaving it in a heated area and using thick insulation. You should aim for a temperature of 90 degrees F inside the container. This temperature will be easier to reach when there are more maggots inside.
     
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