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    How to Raise Baby Pigeons

    ArticlePigeon AdviceWednesday 06 July 2011
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    Pigeon fanciers often enjoy buying pigeons for sale when they are hatchlings and then raising them into squabs; after this stage they then become adults. If you keep the pigeon parents then the process will be even easier as they will do most of the work themselves.

     

    Provide warmth and shelter for your pigeon hatchlings. Some pigeon breeders keep the parent birds and new hatchlings in a large cage if they do not have a pigeon loft. Disinfect the cage as often as possible. If you do have a pigeon loft, equip it with a nesting box. Keep a drinker with fresh water and a feeder with a grain mix and pellets available for the pigeon parents.

     

    Allow the hen and the cock – the pigeon parents – to care for their babies. For the first week squabs are fed regurgitated food formed in the hen or cock's mouth. However, you should use a special canary formula if the hatchlings do not have parents. Place the canary formula in an oral syringe and feed until the pigeon's crop is full every 30 minutes.

     

    Introduce a shop-bought grain mix once the squabs are a week old. The parents will naturally wean the squabs, but if you are feeding them yourself (see above) begin adding a few small seeds to the canary formula. Gradually add more seeds. Squabs should be able to peck seeds and grains by 4 weeks. Stop providing the formula at this point. At 28 to 30 days old you can either release the squabs or introduce them to the rest of your pigeons.

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