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    Yorkshire man banned from keeping protected birds after illegal hawk sales

    NewsRare Birds NewsMonday 15 April 2013
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    A man in Leeds has been banned from keeping nine species of protected bird after he admitted to selling goshawks without a permit. 

    Terence Young, of Woodland Road, Whitkirk, appeared in court after “failing to comply with the strict controls governing trade in endangered species”.
     
    Young, 53, pleaded guilty at Leeds Magistrates’ Court to two charges of illegally selling goshawks without a valid permit and three of failing to comply with the conditions of a permit. He also went on to admit that he had kept an unregistered goshawk which was in violation of the Wildlife and Countryside Act of 1981. 
     
    Permits are used to control the sale of goshawks - which can grow to almost the same size as a buzzard - to prevent them from being taken from the wild. 
     
    These permits are issued in this country by the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency, who carried out the investigation along with the National Wildlife Crime Unit and West Yorkshire Police. 
     
    He was fined £360 and was also ordered to pay £100 in costs after the hearing. As well as the financial penalties, Young was also banned from keeping certain protected birds of prey, including goshawks and peregrines. These birds must be ringed and registered if kept in captivity. 
     
    Andy McWilliam of the National Wildlife Crime Unit told The Yorkshire Post: “Unlike the majority of responsible breeders, Mr Young has failed to comply with the strict controls governing the trade in endangered species.
     
    “He seems to have treated the requirement for permits as an optional extra rather than a legal requirement.”
     
    Alison Clarke of the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency also said: “This case shows that failure to comply can lead to prosecution.”
     
    Picture: Tamburix
     
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