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    Wild Parrots in the Capital

    NewsParrot NewsSaturday 08 January 2011
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    Increasing numbers of wild parrots make their homes in inner London

    It turns out that not just Russian billionaires and international financiers are drawn to the environs of Britain's capital. Increasing amounts of research are being made into the presence of new urban parrot colonies in London and the Home Counties. Parks and gardens in the suburbs of London - but also in inner-city areas such as Kensington, Peckham and Greenwich - are now thought to be home to up to 20,000 wild parrots, mainly parakeets. How these parrots came to be living an independent metropolitan lifestyle has not yet been proven, but what is known is that many of these parrots are species usually found in India and Brazil. A series of mild winters (before this year, at least!) have allowed the parrots to thrive in the capital's many green spaces. Alexandrine parakeets can be found in Lewisham whereas South American monk parakeets are now easily spotted in Borehamwood, home to Elstree Studios (perhaps these are parrots with ambitions in showbusiness?) However, experts are quick to point out that this is not exactly a positive development; parrots can become a pest to farmers and to other native bird species, being big enough and strong enough to drive other birds out of their original habitats. Have any Birdtrader users in London and the Home Counties spotted exotic wild parrots in their own back gardens? It remains to be seen how they'll have coped with this year's harsh winter!

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