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    There is pattern in birds' songs and plumage that helps explaining some of the colourful and tuneful variety in nature, researchers discovered

    NewsBird NewsTuesday 10 July 2012
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    A Canadian team that studied 250 birds throughout the world found, according to BBC Nature that “closely related birds that share the same habitat tend to look and sound different.” This seems to help birds to identify the other individuals from their own species.

    The findings were presented by Dr Paul Martin at he First Joint Congress for Evolutionary Biology in Ottawa.

    "We found, repeatedly, that birds that [live in the same location] with a close relative have more divergent songs and colour patterns," he told BBC Nature.

    "So it looks like costs of sharing a location with a relative drives some of the amazing variation we see."

    "Being different in songs and colour is really important to identify your own species and to avoid mating outside your own species," explained Dr Martin.

    "Colour patterns and songs are traits that are really used for mate attraction and choice… so these are the traits we would expect to diverge."

    Source: BBC Nature

    Photo by: Christine Matthews

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