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    The pigeon 'Bermuda Triangle' may have finally been explained

    NewsPigeon NewsThursday 14 March 2013
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    Pigeon homing has been around for centuries upon centuries and used to great effect yet for some reason pigeons in a certain area of New York State called Jersey Hill were never able to navigate back home again. For ages it has confused scientist arguably until now.
     
    The logic behind the theory is that pigeons acoustic maps of their surrounds by using low frequency sounds to find their way around however at this location in the US they cannot hear the rumble.
     
    Dr Hagstrum argues that birds use the sun as a compass or the earth's magnetic field and an "unknown" map. This map count be based on sound. 
     
    "The sound originates in the ocean. Waves in the deep ocean are interfering and they create sound in both the atmosphere and the Earth. You can pick this energy up anywhere on Earth, in the centre of a continent even."
    So once they released they search for the sound of their home and are therefore able to navigate back. 
    However the  infrasound pigeons listen to can be disrupted by changes in the atmosphere such as wind and temperature.
     
    Dr Hagstrum does state though that this is just a theory and can be seen as controversial. However it is an interesting and logical approach to how pigeons can navigate back to their homes. The atmosphere in Jersey Hill supports this too.
     
    Source: BBC

     

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