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    Some birds benefiting from climate change while others lose out

    NewsBird NewsMonday 13 May 2013
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    A new study has been published byThe Living with Environmental Change Partnership. They studied the impact of climate change on birds in Britain and found that overall the changes were benefiting the birds.
     
    The study found that some animals and plants have suffered greatly at the hands of climate change through seasonal temperatures and rainfall, resident birds have enjoyed the new changes.
     
    Over the –past two decades, with the exception of a couple of harsh winters, the mild winters have allowed species such as robins, wrens and gold crests to have amazing living conditions. Certain species have also been discovered in areas where they were not known to be before due to more foods available and warmer temperatures.
     
    On the other hand though, migrant birds and those that live in the north of England have not done quite so well with the summer conditions and warmer temperatures. For example thrush and blackbirds. These birds tend to rely on insects that are found in wet conditions so long summers hit them the hardest.
     
    The Snow Bunting who requires cooler temperatures have been pushed further up north and to the summits of the mountains too.
     
    It is not just birds however that have to adapt. Across Britain other animals have to cope with the changes such as insects and butterflies.
     
    Dr Mike Morecroft who helped lead the study said that “There is strong evidence from a large number of different scientific studies that the natural world has started to respond to climate change over the last few decades.
    “It also shows the range and complexity of these changes: some species and habitats are much more sensitive than others.”
     
    James Pearce Higgins who helped contribute to the study said that
    “The picture that is emerging on how climate change is affecting our species is complex – it is not all negative nor is it all good.
    “We have tried to give a balanced and up to date position as possible. While some populations will increase, there are others that are declining in abundance.”
     
    It seems that some species will be able to adapt and survive however others will not be able to cope.
     
    Source: Telegraph
     
    Photo: Geograph
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