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    Six out of ten adults in the UK leave out food for garden birds

    NewsBird NewsMonday 18 March 2013
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    New research carried out by the RSPB has revealed that more people than ever in the UK are putting out food for garden birds. 

    Six out of ten adults in the UK have stated that they have fed the birds in their garden over the last year, with over half of the population feeding them at least once a week.
     
    The most popular foods that people are leaving out are seeds and nuts, which are left out by three quarters of those that feed the birds. Two thirds leave out fat products and kitchen scraps. 
     
    The main concern for people when they are choosing their bird food is the price and value. 
     
    The RSPB Wildlife Advisor, Val Osborne, said: 'Gardens are vital habitats for some of our most threatened birds like house sparrows, song thrushes and starlings. It’s heart-warming that people are making them as welcoming for wildlife as possible.
     
    'Given the increasing financial pressures on families it’s not surprising that people consider price above all other factors when buying bird food. Interestingly though, feeding garden birds has increased by 5 per cent over the last ten years, suggesting that people have made it a priority to help nature on their doorsteps despite tough times.' 
     
    When asked why people fed the birds, the most common response was to help wildlife and the environment, however, spending time together as a family enjoying nature was also an important factor. Over a third of the households with children said this was the deciding factor as to why they put out food. 
     
    Val continued; 'For many children, discovering garden wildlife can be the first step in getting to know and love nature.  A simple activity like filling up the feeders and then watching to see which birds visit can bring families together and inspire a shared love of the natural World.'
     
    Later this month, we will reveal the results of Big Garden Birdwatch that took place over the weekend of 26 and 27 January. It’s the World’s biggest wildlife survey with more than half a million people expected to have taken part.
     
    Source: RSPB
     
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