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    Pigeons join the Navy on a sea bound journey.

    NewsPigeon NewsMonday 08 July 2013
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    2 pigeons nicknamed Gregory Peck and Sir Henry Cecil were rescued at sea by a royal Navy warship after they became exhausted and needed a lift home.
     
    It is not uncommon for birds to become stowaways on ships at sea but when the crew on HMS Diamond failed to move the pigeons they became concerned for their welfare. It was only after numerous attempts to move the birds from the £1 billion warship that in the end they decided to adopt them.
     
    It was just off the coast of Plymouth when the stowaway pigeons decided to land on board the ship. The birds stayed on board with the crew for 10 days until the ship returned back to its home base in Portsmouth, Hampshire.
     
    Sailers on the ship became so concerned for the birds that they actually made them a custom built aviary where they could rest and replenish after their long journey.
     
    First Gregory arrived and two days later Cecil dropped by on board.
     
    Speaking on the matter, Navigating Office Lt Eleanor Tilley decided to rescue the birds after the birds were in the way of official practises. She said that they "refused to leave the ship as they were about to start gunnery and helicopter serials".
     
    Commenting further she mentioned that "A ship at sea obviously attracts the occasional bird, but these are usually transient and depart after a short period.
    "Gregory and Cecil were clearly struggling with the journey they had been on and needed help.
    "Having seen them onboard for a few days, and knowing that the ship was to be at sea for some time, the team felt obliged to give them a little support to aide them on their way."
     
    Andy Ingham, the commanding officer of HMS Diamond said that "They have been fairly unusual additions to the ship's company on board.
    "However, both of them have been popular with the team and a healthy distraction for some during our recent time at sea.
    "I suspect they were quite sorry to say goodbye to our transient passengers."
     
    Photo: Geograph
     
    Source: BBC

     

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