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    Greenpeace release spoof advert linking Coca Cola to death of seabirds

    NewsEnvironment & Nature NewsTuesday 07 May 2013
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    Greenpeace has created an advert targeting Coca Colas packing distribution firm and linking it to the death of sea birds. The clip is 45 seconds long and shows people drinking a coke on the beach with dead birds falling down beneath them. At one stage of the video it shows a dead bird with dozens of bottle caps in it’s body. On the video the message “Plastic bottles are killing our seabirds”.
     
    Greenpeace believe that pollution is killing wildlife across the globe especially plastic packaging. They are targeting Coca Cola Amatil which is the Asian-Pacific bottlers who work with Coca Cola.
     
    The director of media and public affairs for Coca-Cola Amiatil said that the company was not against plastic recycling and that it had invested around $450 million in making its PET bottles more lightweight and reducing its carbon footprint by 20%.
     
    Birds often mistake this for food and their stomachs become intoxicated with the different types of plastic. Greenpeace have already launched this campaign with images running in newspapers and also across social media. It hopes it can get the funding to launch this particular advert on prime time television.
     
    BRW report that the beverage industry is opposed and that Coca Cola Amatil with Schweppes and Lion too court action to prevent legislation from happening.
     
    What the campaign wants is a sort of cash for bottles recycling system where people can get a small amount of money for each bottle they return. Some believe however  this will have an adverse affect on the industry
     
    It is not the first time Coca Cola has been in controversy. There have been many disputes with trade unions in South American countries as well as reports of adverse health effects. 
     
    Source: BRW
    Photo: Epsos
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