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    Does migratory bird law need updating?

    NewsBirds of Prey NewsThursday 20 October 2011
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    US - Oregon

    The Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 was one fine-feathered idea. 

    During an era when trade in birds and feathers threatened many species, the landmark act -- one of the world's oldest wildlife conservation statutes -- sealed a deal between the United States and Great Britain to protect birds migrating between the United States and Canada. 

    This week, national and international experts from government, industry and environmental organizations are gathering at Lewis & Clark Law School to talk about how the act might be made more effective in a world where birds face challenges never envisioned in 1918: run-ins with skyscrapers, power lines, wind turbines, pesticide poisoning, oil spills and vast, rapid habitat loss.

    Yesterday's agenda included a talk by Jesse Grantham, national California condor recoverycoordinator with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, plus a panel discussion about the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act. 

    Sessions Friday and Saturday focus on how the Migratory Bird Treaty Act works and how it might be improved. Saturday, those attending will examine bird conservation efforts by U.S. treaty partners, including Canada, Mexico, Great Britain and Japan. 

    Though it's law-centric, organizers say the conference is appropriate for a general audience and it's open to the public. Cost: $70

    Source: Oregon Live

    Picture by TROY MABEN/The Associated Press

     

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