• Parrots
  • Poultry
  • Birds of Prey
  • Pigeons
  • Passerine
  • Bird Accessories and feed
  • Game Birds
  • Wading birds
  • Sea Birds
  • Other birds
  • More
    All Categories
    • All Categories
    • Parrots
    • Poultry
    • Birds of Prey
    • Pigeons
    • Passerine
    • Bird Accessories and feed
    • Game Birds
    • Wading birds
    • Sea Birds
    • Other birds
    • Events
    • Services
    • Other Animals

    Parrot owner given £2000 after bird killed by noise of low flying RAF jet

    NewsBird NewsMonday 03 June 2013
    Share:
    An owner of a rare parrot was given £2200 after the bird was killed by the noise of an RAF Hercules airplane that flew over the house in Ayrshire.
     
    It is just one of many payments that the MoD has paid out in more than 200 claims across the UK. In total the figure reaches £1.4 million. The payouts also include £300 for two therapy groups that were disturbed by the roar of the fighter planes as they were flying overhead. Another person claimed £900 after damage to a child’s trampoline.
     
    Robert Oxley from Taxpayer Scotland said 'There is a danger that the MoD gets used to paying out compensation for these flights regardless of whether it is justified or not.
    'Some payouts appear to be seriously stretching the boundaries of what is reasonable.'
    'Defence chiefs need to do more to ensure incidents that lead to pay-outs are minimised while ensuring pilots still get vital low altitude experience they will need in combat zones.
     
    There are also numerous payments made to farmers who say that the noise has had an impact ion their chicken’s egg-laying abilities as well as other lifestock put off by the incredily loud noises that the jets generate.
     
    Another parrot owner had a plane rush over his house and the parrot was so starlted that it fell to the ground and broke both of his legs. The MoD had to pay the cost of the vet bills and also two splints.
     
    A spokesperson for the MoD said that 'The MoD will authorise the payment of reasonable ex-gratia compensation where a link can be established between MoD military low flying activity and any subsequent loss or injury sustained by a claimant.
     
    'We are very aware of the risks of military flying, and the safety of those on the ground, as well as our aircrew, is one of our highest priorities.'

    It is indeed a dangerous situation as Tim Price from the NFU Mutual said that 'We regularly deal with claims from farmers whose livestock have been spooked by planes.
    'It causes deaths and injuries to livestock, there’s a risk to farmers and members of the public who could themselves be injured by stampeding animals.'

    On the other hand there have been many criticisms of the MoD for paying out such amounts and why the planes are so low in the first place. The MoD responded that the planes need to be accustomed to war time conditions where planes need to fly quite low. 
     
    Source: Dailymail
     
    Photo: Wikimedia
    News
    Subscribe to our newsletter
    //