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    Spotting a Hummingbird Nest

    ArticleThursday 09 December 2010
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    The female hummingbird is the one responsible for making the nest for her eggs. It is not uncommon for female hummingbirds to make two nests and try out both before deciding which one she will use to lay her two precious eggs. There are a few factors that the female hummingbird will take into account when making her decision about the nest, wind, temperature and predators are all important. %%AFC-ADVERT%%

     

    What Hummingbird Nests Look Like

    • A tiny cup of moss about 1.5 inches in diameter.
    • A hummingbird nest is made out of moss, lichen, plant fibres, cotton and dryer lint that are stuck together with spider webs.
    • Female hummingbirds will camouflage their nests with twigs and bits of plant.

     

    Where to Look for Hummingbird Nests

    • You should check the Y shaped branches of trees and bushes. It is common for hummingbird nests to be found here as the branches provide stability in strong winds.
    • A hummingbird nest is usually found high up to avoid predators.
    • If the female hummingbird doesn’t find a suitable nesting place in a tree or bush then she might try building her nest in a crack or opening of a building or house.
    • Hummingbird eggs can’t withstand hot temperatures so you will often find nests in cooler climates. The female hummingbird might also build the nest under leaves so that her eggs are shaded from the sun.
    • It is often cooler by rivers and streams so it is likely that hummingbird nests might be found there.

     

     

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