• Parrots
  • Poultry
  • Birds of Prey
  • Pigeons
  • Passerine
  • Bird Accessories and feed
  • Game Birds
  • Wading birds
  • Sea Birds
  • Other birds
  • More
    All Categories
    • All Categories
    • Parrots
    • Poultry
    • Birds of Prey
    • Pigeons
    • Passerine
    • Bird Accessories and feed
    • Game Birds
    • Wading birds
    • Sea Birds
    • Other birds
    • Events
    • Services
    • Other Animals
    Please select a location from the drop-down list

    How to Care for Baby Birds

    ArticleThursday 09 December 2010
    Share:

    It is quite possible that in the spring time you will encounter an abandoned baby bird in your back garden. Although it is tempting to try and nurse baby birds back to health, this shouldn’t be attempted as feeding baby birds requires special baby bird food that you will not be able to provide. Read on to find out how to care for baby birds and what you should do if you find a baby bird in your garden. %%AFC-ADVERT%%

     

    Caring For a Baby Bird

     

    • If you find a baby bird, the first thing to do is take a good look at it and try to gauge it’s age and condition. If baby birds have feathers and can fly, you should leave it alone and allow the parents of the baby bird to take care of it. During this stage, keep any pets indoors and children away for the baby bird, if after a few hours, there is still no sing of the baby bird’s parents, move on to the next step. 

     

    • The first thing you should do is to try and find the nest that belongs to the baby bird. This could be high in a tree, in a shrub or under the eaves of a house or garage. If possible, pick up the baby bird and put it back in the nest so that the parents can provide the correct baby bird food and protection. 

     

    • It is a myth that the parents will disown baby birds that have been touched by humans but it may be an idea to wear gloves to protect yourself from any potential bites and also from any germs or diseases that the baby bird may be carrying. Make sure you wash your hands after handling any baby birds.

     

    • Don’t attempt feeding baby birds yourself as you will not be able to provide the correct baby bird food and the baby bird will not survive. You will also not be able to socialise the bird correctly to be released. Contact the RSPCA so they can send someone out to collect the baby bird, if for any reason they are not available, contact wildlife centres, zoos or even a vet to try and find somebody to take the baby bird.

     

    • When you are on the phone to a professional about the baby bird, give them as much information as possible and follow their instructions. It is most likely that they will want you to put the baby bird in a shoebox with plenty of bedding and ventilation holes and bring it to them.

     

    • When it comes to saving the baby birds, the more information that the baby bird that you can give the rescue centre, the better. Tell them things such as how long it has been in your garden, what kind of bird it is and where you found it.
    Articles
    Subscribe to our newsletter
    //